Being a teacher is hard work, and it can be incredibly stressful, especially for new teachers. From teachers we have spoken with, we’ve found that the first year is typically the hardest.

So, we’ve asked experienced teachers to share their best advice for teachers who are just starting out. Thank to the great community of teachers that we’ve reached out to, we’re able to share incredible advice to help make your first year much easier. Enjoy!

Best Advice From Four Knowledgeable Math Teachers

Ashley Wofford

Advice

Being a teacher can be a beautiful experience. However, it can also be mentally, physically and emotionally draining, especially when you care tremendously about the students you are working with and put your heart and soul into the job. So, the most important single piece of advice that I would give is to do all teaching related work (grading papers, parent outreach, etc) at school ONLY. It is important to make time for self-care and maintain a healthy work life and personal life balance.

Subjects

I have taught 6th, 7th and 8th grade Mathematics.

Experience

6 Years

Current School

Lyons Community School

Ashley's Best Advice for new Teachers

Mary Coon

Advice

Ask for help! It is only a sign of weakness if you don’t ask when you really need it.

Subjects

Currently- 10th, 11th, 12th - Alg2 Honors, PreCalculus Regents & Intro to Calculus (Calculus 1).

Experience

26 Years

Current School

Saint John the Baptist Diocesan High School

Holly Siebert

Advice

Try to stay organized. Don't take too many resources and try to combine them, you will get overwhelmed. The internet could make you research each topic for hours on end for a short 20-25 minute lesson. Take 1 idea and run with that.

Subjects

I teach 9-12, currently 11-12. I have taught all levels of high school math as well as college level math courses and graduate level courses in math. I have also taught teachers in graduate programs for math education.

Experience

29 Years

Current School

Roy C Ketcham High School in Wappingers Falls, NY

Ronald Blain

Advice

1. Always be prepared and sometimes over prepared for lessons.
2. Build sound relationships with students, it helps if they know that you care about them as an individual. Be supportive of all students, especially those that are struggling.
3. Let parents know that you are working to support their child.
4. Respond promptly and accordingly to parent emails.
5. Make a plan for struggling students, involve parents whenever possible so they know that something is being done.